GamifIR 2015

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GamifIR 2015

The second workshop on Gamification for Information Retrieval took place at ECIR 2015 in Vienna, Austria on the 29th of March. The workshop program included two invited keynote presentations, seven oral presentations of refereed papers, lots of mini discussion sessions and a fishbowl session. The presentations covered diverse topics from playing around with an eye tracker to a game with IR papers and even a game of scientific hangman, generating lively and fun discussions. The workshop was a crowdpinion experiment itself, gathering participants’ momentary opinions via an Android app. One of the main themes of the day was the interplay of gamification aspects and incentives, where the key challenge is to align player motivations with the goal of the task. Any misalignment may lead to gamification as a tool being more damaging than useful with users’ focus shifting from the task to gaming the system.

Topics

We invited the submission of position papers as well as novel research papers and demos addressing problems related to gamification in IR. Topics included but were not limited to:

  • Gamification approaches in a variety of contexts, including document annotation and ground-truth generation; interface design; information seeking; user modelling; knowledge sharing
  • Gamification design
  • Applied game principles, elements and mechanics
  • Gamification analytics
  • Long-term engagement
  • User engagement and motivational factors of gamification
  • Player types, contests, cooperative gamification
  • Search challenges and gamification
  • Game based work and crowdsourcing
  • Applications and prototypes

Accepted Papers

Author Title
Michael Riegler, Ragnhild Eg, Lilian Calvet, Mathias Lux, Pål Halvorsen and Carsten Griwodz Playing Around the Eye Tracker – A Serious Game Based Dataset
Kinga Bettina Faragó, Zoltán Ádám Milacski, András Németh and András Lorincz Enhancing crowdsourced applications via incorporated practice sessions
Anca Livia Radu, Aliaksandr Autayeu, Bogdan Ionescu and Fausto Giunchiglia High Quality Photo Collection via Gamification
Jörg Schlötterer, Christin Seifert, Lisa Wagner and Michael Granitzer A Game with a Purpose to Access Europe's Cultural Treasure
Waqas Moazzam, Michael Riegler, Sagar Sen and Mari Nygård Scientific Hangman: Gamifying Scientific Evidence for General Public
Marek Machnik, Michael Riegler and Sagar Sen Crowdpinion: Motivating people to share their momentary opinion
Jan Rybak, Krisztian Balog and Kjetil Nørvåg IR Game: How well do you know information retrieval papers?

Proceedings

The papers have been published as part of the CEUR proceedings series and can be found in the CEUR digital library.

Program

09:00 – 09:10
Introduction

09:10 – 10:10
Keynote: Human Intelligence in Search and Retrieval (Carsten Eickhoff)

10:10 – 10:30
IR Game: How well do you know information retrieval papers? (Jan Rybak, Krisztian Balog and Kjetil Nørvåg)

10:30 – 11:00
Coffee break

11:00 – 12:00
A Game with a Purpose to Access Europe’s Cultural Treasure (Jörg Schlötterer, Christin Seifert, Lisa Wagner and Michael Granitzer)

High Quality Photo Collection via Gamification (Anca Livia Radu, Aliaksandr Autayeu, Bogdan Ionescu and Fausto Giunchiglia)

Scientific Hangman: Gamifying Scientific Evidence for General Public (Waqas Moazzam, Michael Riegler, Sagar Sen and Mari Nygård)

12:00 – 12:30
Discussion
12:30 – 13:45
Lunch

13:45 – 14:45
Playing Around the Eye Tracker – A Serious Game Based Dataset (Michael Riegler, Ragnhild Eg, Lilian Calvet, Mathias Lux, Pål Halvorsen and Carsten Griwodz)

Enhancing crowdsourced applications via incorporated practice sessions (Kinga Bettina Faragó, Zoltán Ádám Milacski, András Németh and András Lorincz)

Crowdpinion: Motivating people to share their momentary opinion (Marek Machnik, Michael Riegler and Sagar Sen)

14:45 – 15:15
Discussion
15:15 – 15:45
Coffee break
15:45 – 16:45
Keynote: A Game of Search (Leif Azzopardi)

16:45 – 17:30
Fishbowl Session

Keynotes

Carsten Eickhoff (www.carsten-eickhoff.com)
Human Intelligence in Search and Retrieval

Abstract:
“Crowdsourcing has developed to become the magic bullet for all data and annotation needs of the modern IR researcher. The number of studies that rely on the crowd for creating, curating or annotating documents is growing steadily. Traditionally, the main questions that were addressed academically included how to obtain labels cheaply and reliably by identifying and countering spam as well as lowering the pricing bar with constantly evolving incentive and lottery models. In this talk, we will concentrate on a range of forward-looking questions. Are there alternatives to the established insert-coin-for-labor paradigm? Is Mechanical Turk the only way to crowdsource? When (not) to crowdsource a task? How to adequately remunerate crowd labor? And does crowd labor really need computers?”


Leif Azzopardi (leifos.me)
A Game of Search

Abstract:
“Searching is central to our existence. The search for water, food and shelter. The search for employment, transport and love. Searching for things to do, places to go, and people to meet. Of course, in Information Retrieval, we are primarily concerned with the search for information, knowledge and wisdom. If searching is so central to our lives, then are their underlying search strategies that define how we search, and invariably how successful we are. Information Foraging Theory posits that our search behaviour is much like how animals forage for food (as it is derived from Optimal Foraging Theory). But do people search in such a manner? And how can we test such a theory, when so many factors influence the search interaction, behaviours and outcomes? In this talk, I will describe my search for mechanisms to test such theory – specifically focusing on games and gamification as a way to abstract the problem down so that experiments can be conducted in a controlled and precise manner.”

Organizing Committee

  • Frank Hopfgartner, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
  • Gabriella Kazai, Semion Ltd. (United Kingdom)
  • Udo Kruschwitz, University of Essex (United Kingdom)
  • Michael Meder, TU Berlin (Germany)
  • Mark Shovman, Yahoo! Labs (Israel)

Program Committee

  • Omar Alonso, Microsoft Research (USA)
  • Raian Ali, Bournemouth University (UK)
  • Michael Ameling, SAP (Germany)
  • Jon Chamberlain, University of Essex (United Kingdom)
  • Carsten Eickhoff, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
  • Christopher G Harris, The University Of Iowa (USA)
  • Hideo Joho, University of Tsukuba (Japan)
  • Edith Law, University of Waterloo (Canada)
  • Till Plumbaum, TU Berlin (Germany)
  • Craig Stewart, Coventry University (United Kingdom)
  • Albert Weichselbraun, University of Applied Sciences Chur (Switzerland)

Impressions